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Houston, we've got a problem...

Over half

of all food produced in Canada is wasted (58%), the global average is 17%.

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Ranked 3rd

in greenhouse gases generated globally (8%), if food waste were its own country.

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Up to 90%

of soils may be degraded by 2050 globally. Currently we've degraded over one third.

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The solution?

It may not be easy, but it is simple.

Store carbon in soils,
not the atmosphere.

Store carbon in soils,
not the atmosphere.

The
power
of soil
Spoonful of soil and soil microbes

A lot of life.

One teaspoon of healthy soil, contains more microbial life than humans on Earth. Billions of beneficial bacteria, nematodes and fungi all work together to break down decaying organics and form the soil food web which feeds the next generations of life. 87% of life on Earth is reliant on this activity in the top few inches of soil.
Soil Organic carbon versus above ground organic carbon by latitude

A lot of carbon.

There's an estimated 10x more carbon found in soils, than in above-ground vegetation and matter (ex. trees). If we manage our soils by conserving and building its organic matter, we would have a powerful tool against atmospheric carbon and climate change.
The
Wisdom
of the Ancients
Amazon rainforest on globe vector

The Amazon

5 to 10 million or more ancient Amazonian inhabitants are estimated to have lived within the tropical rainforest pre-Columbian colonization (before 1500's).

Once thought to only support small tribes, many remnants of interconnected city networks and advanced farming practices have been rediscovered, engulfed beneath the dense forest. With new mapping technologies and expeditions, we have only just recently just begun to understand their vast secrets in culture, architecture and farming.
Terra preta soil vector

Terra Preta

An advanced agricultural strategy of the ancient Amazonians was the creation of Terra Preta or "Dark Earths". A living soil able to self-regenerate estimated to cover around 3% of the entire rainforest.

Where the Amazon has some of the most infertile soils in the world, these peoples created their own by enhancing the ground with chars, bones and food scraps (compost) to build its organic matter. The result brought higher fertility and nutrients for food production as well as drought resistance compared to surrounding soils.
Jungle tree vector

Shaping Nature

Over one half of the trees found in the Amazon are made up of just 1% of the total species. This means the Amazonians literally shaped the rainforest for thousands of years to domesticate and cultivate food-producing trees to create their own abundance.

These practices had lasting effects on the marvel of the Amazon we know today, and shows the power we as humans have to [sustainably] shape the environment around us.

Essentially all life depends upon the soil... There can be no life without soil and no soil without life; they have evolved together.

- Charles Kellogg
Spoonful of soil and soil microbes

A lot of life.

One teaspoon of healthy soil, contains more microbial life than humans on Earth. Billions of beneficial bacteria, nematodes and fungi all work together to break down decaying organics and form the soil food web which feeds the next generations of life. 87% of life on Earth is reliant on this activity in the top few inches of soil.
Soil Organic carbon versus above ground organic carbon by latitude

A lot of carbon.

There's an estimated 10x more carbon found in soils, than in above-ground vegetation and matter (ex. trees). If we manage our soils by conserving and building its organic matter, we would have a powerful tool against atmospheric carbon and climate change.
Amazon rainforest on globe vector

The Amazon

5 to 10 million or more ancient Amazonian inhabitants are estimated to have lived within the tropical rainforest pre-Columbian colonization (before 1500's).
Once thought to only support small tribes, many remnants of interconnected city networks and advanced farming practices have been rediscovered, engulfed beneath the dense forest. With new mapping technologies and expeditions, we have only just recently just begun to understand their vast secrets in culture, architecture and farming.
Terra preta soil vector

Terra Preta

An advanced agricultural strategy of the ancient Amazonians was the creation of Terra Preta or "Dark Earths". A living soil able to self-regenerate estimated to cover around 3% of the entire rainforest.
Where the Amazon has some of the most infertile soils in the world, these peoples created their own by enhancing the ground with chars, bones and food scraps (compost) to build its organic matter. The result brought higher fertility and nutrients for food production as well as drought resistance compared to surrounding soils.
Jungle tree vector

Shaping Nature

Over one half of the trees found in the Amazon are made up of just 1% of the total species.
This means the Amazonians literally shaped the rainforest for thousands of years to domesticate and cultivate food-producing trees to create their own abundance. These practices had lasting effects on the marvel of the Amazon we know today, and shows the power we as humans have to [sustainably] shape the environment around us.
Products
for ABetter
Future
See Shop

Vermichar

Boost Soil Health.

Slow Release Nutrients.

Happy Soil, Happy Plants.

Size:
2.5L (1.1kg)
Price:

$ 30.00 CAD

More Info
See Product

Biochar

Reduce watering.

Increase nutrient retention.

Create micro-habitats for soil life.

Size:
2.5L (0.8kg)
Price:

$ 30.00 CAD

More Info
See Product

Biochar

Reduce watering.

Increase nutrient retention.

Create micro-habitats for soil life.

Size:
2.5L (0.8kg)
See Product
Price:

$ 30.00 CAD

More Info

Vermichar

Boost Soil Health.

Slow Release Nutrients.

Happy Soil, Happy Plants.

Size:
2.5L (1.1kg)
See Product
Price:

$ 30.00 CAD

More Info
All product sales directly fund our innovations in sustainable organics disposal, soil research and community projects.
A journey to terraform the beyond, begins with you.

Phase 1:

Close the Loop.

To create circularity within our resource streams is imperative. As food waste continues to enter our landfills, we generate potent methane emissions (25x stronger than CO2) which significantly contributes to climate change. Meanwhile we also waste the nutrients and carbon found in organics which our soils so desperately need.

Phase 2:

Restore Earth.

The current status of soil looks grim, and climate change an impeding doom. However the resilience of soils is such that we can still act to terraform Earth, back to its best self meanwhile sequestering carbon naturally in depleted areas. This means building soil organic content to 3-6% and promoting healthy living soil ecosystems. We aim to achieve this through the production of nourishing and living soils

By preventing further erosion, rejuvenating deserted soils, eliminating chemicals and building vegetation to shade soils - we may have a shot at reversing humankind's destructive past.

Phase 3:

The Beyond.

By understanding how to reverse desertification and degradation here on Earth, we can begin to ponder ways of rehabilitating the red desert soils of Mars. As humankind embarks on its expanse through the cosmos, let our legacy be one where life is created and preserved through sustainable land management and rejuvenation practices, rather than destruction and extinction.